Thursday, November 1, 2007

Birds and Slots

As if reading about one of the Royals in England allegedly shooting dead some endangered Hen Harriers wasn't enough this week, Dan Rodericks wrote an article in this morning's Baltimore Sun suggesting that a casino be built on Fort Carroll. It's not the most pristine land, to be sure. The ground and water surrounding it are contaminated with delicious stuff like lead, heavy metals and PCB's. Yum!

Fort Carroll is an abandoned island that numerous Herons (including a sizeable colony of Black Crowned Night Herons) and Egrets now call home. You can read the article HERE. In any case, Dan suggests developing the island, while designating some section of nearby shoreline as 'protected' and then simply have the birds relocate. (Maybe the herons could be moved in the middle of some snowy winter's night with help from a few Mayflower vans?)

Mr. Roderick does have a point. It is vital that we find suitable places for Maryland's poorest citizens to gamble away their paychecks. Still, I say saving the birds is important as well!

But that leaves us with the issue of where Maryland should put these slot machines? Perhaps our State can borrow a few portables from the schools and put slots in them? Kids could gamble and it would contribute to their own education! Mmm, I might be on to something here. Wait, I know! Forget the blood-mobile or the book-mobile. How about a SLOT-MOBILE? Then the Governor could bring slots to all of the State's poorest neighborhoods!

And not a single bird would be harmed!

But, if they decide to build a giant casino on Fort Carroll, I think it'd be a nice touch to replace all of the 'cherries' on the slot machines with cute little pictures of black crowned night herons!

On a similar note: If you live in Maryland, please write/call/meet with your State Representatives and ask them to not raise taxes.

Good birding,

Dan

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