Monday, August 20, 2007

The Week In Review

Wednesday afternoon I was kayaking on Weems Creek in Annapolis with my Golden Retriever (Oiseau). I saw this very small heron fly out of some grasses, hugging the shoreline and then it went out of sight. A few seconds later, I saw it fly back and to a rocky shore with grasses very near to where I was sitting (with dog on board). I slowly paddled over and got within 4-5 feet before Oiseau decided to jump up.

The bird in question stood motionless until my dog decided to try to exit the kayak, and then immediately flew off.

It had a dark head, yellowish-gray thin legs and a light grayish chest and body. It wasn't thick in the neck and bill like a Green or Black-Crowned Night Heron (which I've seen around Weems Creek before). It was small and more slight.... easily less than 12" H standing. It did do some sqwaucking as it flew off into some thicker grass.

What was it? Well, my thoughts were that the bird in question was a Least Bittern. It could be a Black Crowned Night Heron however. Sometime soon I will go back for a second look in the hopes of confirming this ID.

On Saturday morning, I decided to get up early after a long night of rock and rolling in downtown Annapolis. I recently got a permit to the Annapolis Waterworks Park.


It's a great little oasis in the overdevolped urban blah of Annapolis. This morning between 8 and 10 AM I saw...

Northern Flicker
Eastern Wood Pewee
Amercian Goldfinch
Belted Kingfisher
Tree Swallow (first in a while... it's been mostly barns for the past month)
Cedar Waxwing (This bird was all alone and at a distance, so I can't rule out a Bohemian Waxwing)
Chickadee
Osprey
Great Blue Heron
Black Vulture
American Robin
Mourning Dove
Northern Cardinal
Pileated Woodpecker (heard)
Yellow Breasted Chat (heard)
Turkey Vulture
Red Tailed Hawk
Eastern Kingbird
Tufted Titmouse

I look forward to many more visits as fall migration heats up.

This morning (Sunday) I dropped by for a quick visit to the Greenbury Point Nature Center and Mulching facility. Not too much to speak of really. Two Osprey, three Ruby Throated Hummingbirds (a male, female and juv), a few Mourning Dove, American Goldfinch, American Crows, American Robin, two Great Blue Herons, a Chipping Sparrow, a Winter Wren and several Mockingbirds. I heard one Bobwhite and then the rain came... thankfully.

It wasn't much rain, so I decided to venture out to the Annapolis Waterworks park for the second day in a row. I've heard that the day after a cold front moves in is even better than the first. It's true. There were warblers abound, more Cedar Waxwings then I've ever seen in one place and two Northern Waterthrush. But, the best bird was a Black and White Warbler that decided to get within three feet of me near the parking lot. Phishing will do that you know. I don't know my warbler songs all that well, so I will not go out on a limb to say I heard any particular bird. As I get better, I'll let you know.


Louisiana Waterthrush


And one more


My feet hiking.


The wildflowers are cool.


The complete list:
Blue Gray Gnatcatcher OR a Red Eyed Vireo (1) feeding a baby Brown Headed Cowbird (1)
Cedar Waxwing (numerous)
Black and White Warbler (1)
Louisiana Waterthrush (2)
House Wren (1)
Mourning Dove (2)
Eastern Phoebe (2 heard / 1 seen)
Bald Northern Cardinal (1)
Regular Northern Cardinal (4)
Barn Swallow (1)
American Goldfinch (many)
Black Vulture (1)
Turkey Vulture (1)
Yellow warbler (heard)
Downy Woodpecker (2)
Northern Flicker (2)
White breasted nuthatch (1)
Red-eyed Vireo (1 heard / 1 seen)
Chimney Swift (1)
Blue Gray Gnatcatcher (1 seen / 1 heard)
Chickadee (numerous)
Tufted Titmouse (numerous)
Osprey (1)
Song Sparrow (1 heard)
Great Blue Heron (1)
Blue Jay (1)


See, a tree. Ah, but look closer and...

... you'll see a Great Blue Heron.



Be well,

Dan

1 comment:

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